July42013

fauxmosexualtranstrender:

feferi:

Nicki is having none of your cisnormative bullshit. (x)

THE GIF! SOMEONE DID IT!

(Source: inthecoralsea, via )

December182012

An Explanation of Queer-Baiting and Why it’s a Problem

fauxmosexualtranstrender:

zemmer:

In this context, I am using the word “queer” as an umbrella term for gay, bisexual, pansexual, trans*, and gender-variant people. I recognize that it is not ideal, and I am sorry for that.

For those of you who don’t understand the concept of queer-baiting, allow me to explain it. Queer-baiting is what happens when a series wants to attract a queer audience without alienating their homophobic/transphobic audience. They introduce a character that queer people can relate to. They use the details and feelings common to queer people’s lives to make it very obvious to anyone who is queer, that the character is also queer. They know that because there is very little queer representation in media, queer people are going to latch onto this character, and therefore latch onto the series.

However, they never let the character actually come out. When the homophobic/transphobic part of the audience starts to realize that the character is queer, the writers add something to reassure them that no, of course the character is straight. Often, this takes the form of a character who is clearly portrayed as gay suddenly entering a straight relationship, but that is not the only way it can play out.

What this does, is tell queer people that their stories are not decent or important enough to be told. This tells queer people that their stories are only acceptable if they’re changed to be the stories of heteronormative people.

Additionally, when queer people say, “I identified with this character as a queer person,” or “I think this character could have been queer,” the heteronormative parts of the audience are encouraged to tell queer people that they should not be saying that. The heteronormative parts of the audience are encouraged to tell queer people, “stop projecting,” and “stop dragging respectable heteronormative characters into your weird issues.” Queer people are told that they should be ashamed of themselves for thinking that the character was being portrayed as queer.

Queer-baiting is even more painful than erasure, because it dangles fair and equal representation in front of your eyes, and then snatches it away. And then it tells you that the whole thing was in your imagination all along.

I have such mixed feelings about queer baiting, because the above is painfully true, but I still enjoy it because there’s so little actual representation in the media to turn to. 

But that’s exactly what makes this so painfully true…

(Source: actualanimevillain, via )

October142012
beautilation:

At Comic Con today, I went as Black Cat. This is a shitty picture and there will be better ones of my whole costume coming up but I just want to say something. 
Black Cat’s costume has a fair amount of cleavage (conservative compared to many other female comic characters but a good amount as far as what I’ve ever shown). I guess I was not surprised to have a couple men ask to pose with me and then do some doofy “WHOA LOOK AT THOSE KNOCKERS” poses. I just make a really ugly face when I see they’re doing it. One guy with the social graces of a lemur said to me “I was this close to wearing that same outfit. My breasts are large and supple and I think it would have been nice.” Nope. Stop talking.
But aside from guys being doofy and awkward (but clearly not foul-intentioned), I did have my first truly skeezy experience at Comic Con today. 
And my first truly empowering moment as well.
This group of men from some kind of Stan Lee fan club blah blah internet video channel blah blah asked to interview with them on camera about Comic Con. I said well okay, sure. Camera is rolling. The “host” is a middle aged, rotund dude. It’s an all-male crew and lots of people (mostly guys) were beginning to crowd around. The following is the interview as burned in my mind. Keep in mind that I expected this to be about Comic Con in general.
Him: I’m here with…
Me: Mandy, aka Felicia Hardy aka Black Cat
Him: ..And she is HOT. Do you think I’m hot enough to pull that off?
Me: Uh, I’m not sure, I’ve never seen you in drag.
Him: I’ve got a great ass. Go on, spank me.
Me: (look at his large ass, popped up mere inches away from me then look into the camera like are you kidding me . No thanks. I may hurt you, I’m a lot stronger than I look.
Him: Aw come on!
Me: No, seriously. Stop.
Him: Damn, alright! Well let me ask you an important question then…what is your cup size?
Me: (big talk show smile) That is actually none of your fucking business.
Him: Oh! I think that means to say she’s a C. 
Me: I actually have no breasts at all, what you see is just all of the fat from my midsection pulled up to my chest and carefully held in place with this corset. It’s really uncomfortable, I don’t know why I do it.
 Him: (to the male crowd) Aw, come on what do you guys think? C cup? 
—a few males start to shout out cup sizes as I stand there looking at this guy like this has to be a fucking joke, then look at the crowd and see that no amount of witty banter or fiestiness will stop making this whole thing fucking dumb. It was clearly a ploy to single out cosplaying women to get them to talk sexual innuendos and flirt with this asshole and let him talk down to them simply because they were in costume and were attractive. Whether I’m in a skintight catsuit or not, I’m a fucking professional in everything I do and I don’t need to play nice for this idiot.
Me: This is not an interview, this is degrading. I’m done. (I walk away)
Him: (clearly dumbfounded and surprised) ..Come on, it’s all in good fun!
Me: Being degraded is fun? That was unprofessional and I hope that isn’t your day job because you can’t interview for shit, my man.
And the entire crew and the crowd were SILENT. NOTHING. SHOCK, HONEY. It felt like I was in a heated fog, full of rage and pride and I sashayed away feeling like the most badass motherfucker in the whole damn room, but kind of also on the verge of tears. A slow build of applause would have been appropriate, but from the looks on people’s faces, they were just completely not expecting me to do what I just did- which was really nothing more than speaking up for myself. It wasn’t something one should feel brave for doing but crazy for not doing when necessary.
It’s because many people at these cons expect women cosplaying as vixens (or even just wearing particularly flattering costumes) to be open/ welcoming to crude male commentary and lecherous ogling, like our presence comes with subtitles that say “I represent your fantasy thus you may treat me like a fantasy and not a human in a costume”. And maybe that will always be how the majority of people see us. But that does not mean we have to put up with shit that crosses the line, it does not mean we owe them a fantasy, it does not mean we dress up to have guys drooling over us and letting us know that we turn them on. It is not all about your dicks, gentlemen. So I encourage cosplaying women everywhere to be blunt and vocal with their rights, their personal boundaries, and their comfort level at conventions. I actually encourage girls to be brashly shameless about these things, to not be afraid to speak up if you feel uncomfortable and to let the person doing it know that they are crossing the line. Don’t keep quiet because you’re scared of what they might say or think- because if you say nothing they will continue to see what they’re doing as OK. 

beautilation:

At Comic Con today, I went as Black Cat. This is a shitty picture and there will be better ones of my whole costume coming up but I just want to say something. 

Black Cat’s costume has a fair amount of cleavage (conservative compared to many other female comic characters but a good amount as far as what I’ve ever shown). I guess I was not surprised to have a couple men ask to pose with me and then do some doofy “WHOA LOOK AT THOSE KNOCKERS” poses. I just make a really ugly face when I see they’re doing it. One guy with the social graces of a lemur said to me “I was this close to wearing that same outfit. My breasts are large and supple and I think it would have been nice.” Nope. Stop talking.

But aside from guys being doofy and awkward (but clearly not foul-intentioned), I did have my first truly skeezy experience at Comic Con today. 

And my first truly empowering moment as well.

This group of men from some kind of Stan Lee fan club blah blah internet video channel blah blah asked to interview with them on camera about Comic Con. I said well okay, sure. Camera is rolling. The “host” is a middle aged, rotund dude. It’s an all-male crew and lots of people (mostly guys) were beginning to crowd around. The following is the interview as burned in my mind. Keep in mind that I expected this to be about Comic Con in general.

  • Him: I’m here with…
  • Me: Mandy, aka Felicia Hardy aka Black Cat
  • Him: ..And she is HOT. Do you think I’m hot enough to pull that off?
  • Me: Uh, I’m not sure, I’ve never seen you in drag.
  • Him: I’ve got a great ass. Go on, spank me.
  • Me: (look at his large ass, popped up mere inches away from me then look into the camera like are you kidding me . No thanks. I may hurt you, I’m a lot stronger than I look.
  • Him: Aw come on!
  • Me: No, seriously. Stop.
  • Him: Damn, alright! Well let me ask you an important question then…what is your cup size?
  • Me: (big talk show smile) That is actually none of your fucking business.
  • Him: Oh! I think that means to say she’s a C. 
  • Me: I actually have no breasts at all, what you see is just all of the fat from my midsection pulled up to my chest and carefully held in place with this corset. It’s really uncomfortable, I don’t know why I do it.
  •  Him: (to the male crowd) Aw, come on what do you guys think? C cup? 
  • —a few males start to shout out cup sizes as I stand there looking at this guy like this has to be a fucking joke, then look at the crowd and see that no amount of witty banter or fiestiness will stop making this whole thing fucking dumb. It was clearly a ploy to single out cosplaying women to get them to talk sexual innuendos and flirt with this asshole and let him talk down to them simply because they were in costume and were attractive. Whether I’m in a skintight catsuit or not, I’m a fucking professional in everything I do and I don’t need to play nice for this idiot.
  • Me: This is not an interview, this is degrading. I’m done. (I walk away)
  • Him: (clearly dumbfounded and surprised) ..Come on, it’s all in good fun!
  • Me: Being degraded is fun? That was unprofessional and I hope that isn’t your day job because you can’t interview for shit, my man.

And the entire crew and the crowd were SILENT. NOTHING. SHOCK, HONEY. It felt like I was in a heated fog, full of rage and pride and I sashayed away feeling like the most badass motherfucker in the whole damn room, but kind of also on the verge of tears. A slow build of applause would have been appropriate, but from the looks on people’s faces, they were just completely not expecting me to do what I just did- which was really nothing more than speaking up for myself. It wasn’t something one should feel brave for doing but crazy for not doing when necessary.

It’s because many people at these cons expect women cosplaying as vixens (or even just wearing particularly flattering costumes) to be open/ welcoming to crude male commentary and lecherous ogling, like our presence comes with subtitles that say “I represent your fantasy thus you may treat me like a fantasy and not a human in a costume”. And maybe that will always be how the majority of people see us. But that does not mean we have to put up with shit that crosses the line, it does not mean we owe them a fantasy, it does not mean we dress up to have guys drooling over us and letting us know that we turn them on. It is not all about your dicks, gentlemen. So I encourage cosplaying women everywhere to be blunt and vocal with their rights, their personal boundaries, and their comfort level at conventions. I actually encourage girls to be brashly shameless about these things, to not be afraid to speak up if you feel uncomfortable and to let the person doing it know that they are crossing the line. Don’t keep quiet because you’re scared of what they might say or think- because if you say nothing they will continue to see what they’re doing as OK. 

September222012
tumbl-down:

The Misconception of Amy Pond

5.01 “The Eleventh Hour”
Rory: How can he be real? He was never real! It was just a game. We were- we were kids. You made me dress up as him!

Right here, with this quote, I knew the characterization of Amy Pond was going to go seriously awry.
Kids love to play pretend, don’t they?
Moffat was a Who fan as a kid, right? I bet he played Doctor Who pretend. Yet somehow I don’t think he assigned the role of Doctor to others. I mean, the Doctor is the hero! You don’t assign that role to another kid! You fight for your right to be the Doctor! Maybe you take turns with who gets to be him. Maybe there’s three Doctors running around at the same time and it gets a big squiggly. But whatever you do, you don’t freely abdicate the hero role.
Unless you’re a girl.
Apparently.
Steven Moffat could not conceive of a little Amelia Pond who would look at the magical Doctor and his blue box and want to be him. He assumed she would want to be with him instead.
Actual little girls, however, are well-versed in this problem. I know I had a lot of contradictory feelings about Indiana Jones. (“He’s so dreamy!” “I want to be an archaeologist when I grow up!” “Mom, can I have a whip for my birthday?”) Most of the heroes- the characters it’s most fun to imagine being- are dudes. If you also happen to find some of those dudes attractive, you’re going to develop the “I want to be you/I want to be with you” duality. This is something that straight guys like Moffat have not needed to deal with, as characters for them were nicely divided into a binary of those they want to be (male heroes) and those they want to be with (the hot ladies male heroes get).
So when Moffat created Amelia he projected this binary on to her, but reversed it. She’s a girl! The Doctor is a dude! Obviously she wants to be with him! I’m not even sure he realizes it’s possible for Amelia to want to be the Doctor. Yes, if someone asked him directly if he thought little girls wanted to grow up to be the Doctor he’d probably agree, but the point is it didn’t occur to him when he was actually writing her character.
And so she becomes The Girl Who Waited, waited for the hero’s return, and not The Girl Who Dreamed, dreamed of being the hero.
Amelia Pond, drawing Doctor fanart in crayon- are you our on-screen fangirl cypher? Dreaming of what male creators think we want: romance! With an awkward, unnecessary love triangle! Uh, girls love that, right?
Enter the series 7 promo still.
I look at this and think- what fantasy does this appeal to? That’s no hero shot, not of Amy Pond.
The girl who waited, carried away.
It’s everything that’s been there from the beginning, that we’ve tried to put aside. The misconception of Amy Pond. As the love interest, the sidekick, and not the hero. In the hero’s arms and not the hero.
Where is the image of Amy Pond, hero? Why can’t that sell the show? Why a damsel in distress shot?
Ah, but we don’t want to confuse the little boys, the mini-Moffats, by making them want to be her, instead of just be with her. How weird that would be!
So Amy will stay as she is, in the Doctor’s arms, safe.

tumbl-down:

The Misconception of Amy Pond

5.01 “The Eleventh Hour”

Rory: How can he be real? He was never real! It was just a game. We were- we were kids. You made me dress up as him!

Right here, with this quote, I knew the characterization of Amy Pond was going to go seriously awry.

Kids love to play pretend, don’t they?

Moffat was a Who fan as a kid, right? I bet he played Doctor Who pretend. Yet somehow I don’t think he assigned the role of Doctor to others. I mean, the Doctor is the hero! You don’t assign that role to another kid! You fight for your right to be the Doctor! Maybe you take turns with who gets to be him. Maybe there’s three Doctors running around at the same time and it gets a big squiggly. But whatever you do, you don’t freely abdicate the hero role.

Unless you’re a girl.

Apparently.

Steven Moffat could not conceive of a little Amelia Pond who would look at the magical Doctor and his blue box and want to be him. He assumed she would want to be with him instead.

Actual little girls, however, are well-versed in this problem. I know I had a lot of contradictory feelings about Indiana Jones. (“He’s so dreamy!” “I want to be an archaeologist when I grow up!” “Mom, can I have a whip for my birthday?”) Most of the heroes- the characters it’s most fun to imagine being- are dudes. If you also happen to find some of those dudes attractive, you’re going to develop the “I want to be you/I want to be with you” duality. This is something that straight guys like Moffat have not needed to deal with, as characters for them were nicely divided into a binary of those they want to be (male heroes) and those they want to be with (the hot ladies male heroes get).

So when Moffat created Amelia he projected this binary on to her, but reversed it. She’s a girl! The Doctor is a dude! Obviously she wants to be with him! I’m not even sure he realizes it’s possible for Amelia to want to be the Doctor. Yes, if someone asked him directly if he thought little girls wanted to grow up to be the Doctor he’d probably agree, but the point is it didn’t occur to him when he was actually writing her character.

And so she becomes The Girl Who Waited, waited for the hero’s return, and not The Girl Who Dreamed, dreamed of being the hero.

Amelia Pond, drawing Doctor fanart in crayon- are you our on-screen fangirl cypher? Dreaming of what male creators think we want: romance! With an awkward, unnecessary love triangle! Uh, girls love that, right?

Enter the series 7 promo still.

I look at this and think- what fantasy does this appeal to? That’s no hero shot, not of Amy Pond.

The girl who waited, carried away.

It’s everything that’s been there from the beginning, that we’ve tried to put aside. The misconception of Amy Pond. As the love interest, the sidekick, and not the hero. In the hero’s arms and not the hero.

Where is the image of Amy Pond, hero? Why can’t that sell the show? Why a damsel in distress shot?

Ah, but we don’t want to confuse the little boys, the mini-Moffats, by making them want to be her, instead of just be with her. How weird that would be!

So Amy will stay as she is, in the Doctor’s arms, safe.

(Source: alannadoom, via ihavealittlefeminism)

June32012
“But that’s not, ultimately, what I want stories to give me. […] I can’t have a story where Kirk and Spock touch hands without the glass between them at the end of Wrath of Khan. I can’t have a story where Merlin and Arthur fall in love on NBC prime time and the world doesn’t end.

[…] I know that even shows that do give us even strong homoerotic elements are being gutsy. But I want more. […] As long as homosexuality exists only on the periphery of mainstream stories, and is only presented in “acceptable” overt ways, it will continue to reinforce the celluloid closet. It will continue to reinforce among the ignorant the idea that homosexuality isn’t something that applies to them or what/who they love. […]

I want those main characters to fall in love and make out because it means that fans of their characters will have to come to terms with their gayness, exactly like they would have to do in real life.” bookshop@LiveJournal: “i know you care for him as much as i do” (via nonisland)

(via fuckyeahspnhearourvoice)

June12012
“The victim who is able to articulate the situation of the victim has ceased to be a victim: he or she has become a threat.”

James Baldwin (via funkyfest)

this is why people of color, or any marginalized group of people, raising consciousness scares the shit out of the privileged. 

(via brazenbitch)

(Source: , via warpfactornope)

May302012
squintyoureyes:

This is SO raven. <333333

squintyoureyes:

This is SO raven. <333333

(via myjourneymythoughts)

May262012
“We let Willow cut her hair. When you have a little girl, it’s like how can you teach her that you’re in control of her body? If I teach her that I’m in charge of whether or not she can touch her hair, she’s going to replace me with some other man when she goes out in the world. She can’t cut my hair but that’s her hair. She has got to have command of her body. So when she goes out into the world, she’s going out with a command that it is hers. She is used to making those decisions herself. We try to keep giving them those decisions until they can hold the full weight of their lives.”

(On why he let Willow cut all of her hair off)

Read more: Will Smith On Allowing Willow To Cut Her Hair: ‘She Has Got To Have Command Of Her Body’ | Necole Bitchie.com

- He raises a really great point. What would it mean to believe very early that my body was mine. That it’s not for anyone or for any particular purpose other than to be mine until I decide otherwise.

(via larepublicadedet)

I was damned near 30 before I could believe my body belonged to me & me alone. Dear people who take an issue with this,

Let the Smiths do right by their babies & shut the fuck up about how you think they should parent.

(via karnythia)

Lot of love for Will Smith right now.

(via inflateablefilth)

(via ihavealittlefeminism)

May212012

trubr0wn:

dank-potion:

If you can tell me with a straight face that Islamophobia isn’t directly connected with racism, with White Christians wreaking havoc on entire autonomous continents for the past millennium without so much as a blip of a stain on their faith, I’m just going to assume you live under a rock or on a different planet.

THIS THIS THIS THIS

(Source: maarnayeri, via myjourneymythoughts)

May172012
pixyled:

yamino:

My headcanon is that Othergirl-sempai is actually a very socially aware critical thinker and doesn’t give a crap what people think of her based on her looks.  She earned every penny she spent on modding that bod.
Meanwhile, Normal-chan is well-meaning but naive and shallow fangirl who can be quite bratty.  Despite having quite low self esteem, she still thinks she’s better than everyone else.  It’s complicated.

YES THIS IS MY HEADCANON TOO

pixyled:

yamino:

My headcanon is that Othergirl-sempai is actually a very socially aware critical thinker and doesn’t give a crap what people think of her based on her looks.  She earned every penny she spent on modding that bod.

Meanwhile, Normal-chan is well-meaning but naive and shallow fangirl who can be quite bratty.  Despite having quite low self esteem, she still thinks she’s better than everyone else.  It’s complicated.

YES THIS IS MY HEADCANON TOO

(via hellaraz)

May142012
“Don’t give any legitimacy to the haters, don’t accord them respect when they show us none, don’t play nice with the enemy. Take off the kid gloves, call a bigot a bigot, and arsehole and arsehole and don’t be afraid to scream bloody murder and curse a blue streak when its deserved – because sometimes, they don’t deserve anything else.”

Sometimes being rude is the acceptable response (via biyuti)

hot damn yes

(via dumbthingswhitepplsay)

(via kaylynthedyke)

May132012

“I sure wouldn’t like my life to be entirely in the hands of someone else, no matter how noble or altruistic they appear to be.”

andinthatmomentisworewewere:

“It’s seen as the more acceptable face of sexism now, in that women are protected rather than victimised”


These are some extracts from Ben’s excellent article on chivalry. I think the latter expresses perfectly my problem with it, that although certainly being protected is nicer than being victimised, ultimately both are things that are done to women by men. I want to be the one with power to choose how to treat people, not always be the passive bland article into which kindness or cruelty is poured by men. I want a say in the whole thing.

I think ultimatly it comes down to the reason for your actions. Buying flowers, holding open doors, there is nothing inherently chivalrous in these things. ‘Chivalry’ is when you think that you will kindly help out someone below you by giving them some kind of cute token gesture. “I will pay for dinner.. because you cant afford it because women dont have money” is chivalrous. “I will pay for dinner because I like you, other human being, and I would like to do something generous,” is not. That’s just kindness. I think men should be careful when they use the word chivalry, a term loaded with the history of powerful men and powerless women. Don’t get it confused with kindness.

Recently I went out for drinks with my flatmates, one bought me a drink. Later the discussion turned to feminism and drink buyer said, like he had a trump card, “well you let me buy you a drink.. feminist, hur, hur.” To which all I could say was, “I though you were buying me a drink because im your flatmate and you liked me.. not because of my gender.”

Kindness =/ Chivalry

(Source: shebangshebangdoodoodoo)

April282012
albinwonderland:

amantesuntamentes:

wtfwhiteprivilege:


How to Raise Racist Kids
Step One: Don’t talk about race. Don’t point out skin color. Be “color blind.”
Step Two: Actually, that’s it. There is no Step Two.
Congratulations! Your children are well on their way to believing that &lt;insert your ethnicity here&gt; is better than everybody else.
Surprised? So were authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman when they started researching the issue of kids and race for their book NurtureShock. It turns out that a lot of our assumptions about raising our kids to appreciate diversity are entirely wrong:

Click to read the article!

don’t you just love it when people finally accept the glaringly obvious? i know a lot of people that need to read this

The article above is great, as is this one on how to talk about racism with kids.

albinwonderland:

amantesuntamentes:

wtfwhiteprivilege:

How to Raise Racist Kids

Step One: Don’t talk about race. Don’t point out skin color. Be “color blind.”

Step Two: Actually, that’s it. There is no Step Two.

Congratulations! Your children are well on their way to believing that <insert your ethnicity here> is better than everybody else.

Surprised? So were authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman when they started researching the issue of kids and race for their book NurtureShock. It turns out that a lot of our assumptions about raising our kids to appreciate diversity are entirely wrong:

Click to read the article!

don’t you just love it when people finally accept the glaringly obvious? i know a lot of people that need to read this

The article above is great, as is this one on how to talk about racism with kids.

(via lipstick-feminists)

April112012

chotpot:

People are butts about gender sometimes! So here is a comic talking about how it really isn’t a big deal!

When I was with James this week I wrote a little poem about gender
and decided to draw a comic for said poem.

Hope you guys enjoy!

(via amazondi)

March92012
rabbleprochoice:

The Blunt amendment would have allowed employers (secular OR religious) to deny hormonal contraceptive coverage to their employees if they had any moral basis for wanting to refuse it. The senate voted to table it, or basically put it off to the side.
President Obama recently set down a mandate that requires employers to include preventative care services on their employees’s health care plans. Preventative care includes hormonal contraceptive use. President Obama knew this would be an issue for religious employers so the mandate was altered to say that religious employers did not need to provide hormonal contraceptive coverage as part of preventative car in their health plans, but to cover this gap in care the insurance company would need to offer/provide such coverage instead.
So, if you work for a Catholic university that does not want to cover your birth control pills, for example, and your health insurance through them is Blue Cross Blue Shield (or some other insurance company), then Blue Cross Blue Shield will need to offer you coverage for your birth control pills instead of the Catholic university.
This compromise is actually quite amazing. Religious employers will not be forced to provide something that they morally disagree with but the employees that are affected by such a decision will not lose coverage for their hormonal contraceptives because the insurance company will offer coverage instead. So there are no gaps in preventative care coverage (which covers a large range of services in addition to hormonal contraceptives), no one’s religious freedom is being affected, and the cost of birth control will go down, along with possible reduction of insurance costs.
Blunt’s amendment would have made it so that ANY employer could refuse to cover preventative care for any “moral” reason even if it was a secular employer. It’s good that the senate tabled this because there is simply no reason for it. The GOP is attempting to make a scandal where there isn’t one. When the compromise I detailed above happened, religious employers were generally pleased and no gaps in care were left.
This is a good mandate. It will help a lot of people get the care they need and employers have a duty to provide their employees with health coverage.
Love,
Rabble 
Rebloggable was requested.

rabbleprochoice:

The Blunt amendment would have allowed employers (secular OR religious) to deny hormonal contraceptive coverage to their employees if they had any moral basis for wanting to refuse it. The senate voted to table it, or basically put it off to the side.

President Obama recently set down a mandate that requires employers to include preventative care services on their employees’s health care plans. Preventative care includes hormonal contraceptive use. President Obama knew this would be an issue for religious employers so the mandate was altered to say that religious employers did not need to provide hormonal contraceptive coverage as part of preventative car in their health plans, but to cover this gap in care the insurance company would need to offer/provide such coverage instead.

So, if you work for a Catholic university that does not want to cover your birth control pills, for example, and your health insurance through them is Blue Cross Blue Shield (or some other insurance company), then Blue Cross Blue Shield will need to offer you coverage for your birth control pills instead of the Catholic university.

This compromise is actually quite amazing. Religious employers will not be forced to provide something that they morally disagree with but the employees that are affected by such a decision will not lose coverage for their hormonal contraceptives because the insurance company will offer coverage instead. So there are no gaps in preventative care coverage (which covers a large range of services in addition to hormonal contraceptives), no one’s religious freedom is being affected, and the cost of birth control will go down, along with possible reduction of insurance costs.

Blunt’s amendment would have made it so that ANY employer could refuse to cover preventative care for any “moral” reason even if it was a secular employer. It’s good that the senate tabled this because there is simply no reason for it. The GOP is attempting to make a scandal where there isn’t one. When the compromise I detailed above happened, religious employers were generally pleased and no gaps in care were left.

This is a good mandate. It will help a lot of people get the care they need and employers have a duty to provide their employees with health coverage.

Love,

Rabble 

Rebloggable was requested.

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